Tagged: Taxation

Here for the Holidays – New Jersey’s Tax Amnesty Program

As a welcome end-of-year present for those with overdue taxes, New Jersey recently launched its tax amnesty program, which began on November 15, 2018 and will end on January 15, 2019. Tax amnesty is available only for State tax liabilities for tax returns due on or after February 1, 2009, and before September 1, 2017. The program offers a waiver of some penalties, Referral Cost Recovery Fees, or cost of collection fees and one-half of the balance of the interest that remains due as of November 1, 2018. My Gibbons colleagues Peter J. Ulrich and Todd M. Kellert wrote a great article on the Tax Amnesty Program, which you can find here. If you have any questions, please contact us since the program is quickly coming to a close. Michael D. DeLoreto is an Associate in the Gibbons Government & Regulatory Affairs Department.

Governor Murphy Delivers Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Address

Governor Phil Murphy delivered his first budget address to the New Jersey State Legislature on Tuesday, March 13th. The Governor’s proposed Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Budget totals $37.4 billion, which is a $2.7 billion increase from the $34.7 billion spending plan enacted in Fiscal Year 2018. The Governor stated that the proposed FY 2019 Budget is “realistic and responsible,” affirms New Jersey’s values, and will begin the process of returning New Jersey to being a “good value for good money.” To accomplish this, Governor Murphy is proposing to: Increase public school spending by $341 million in FY 2019 with the goal of reaching full funding in four years; Invest an additional $83 million in pre-K this year and start a four-year expansion of a statewide program; Make community college tuition free for all in three years by investing an additional $50 million this fiscal year; Add 3,500 new Tuition Aid Grant awards; Triple funding for New Jersey Transit with an additional $242 million in investment; Increase the Earned Income Tax Credit from 35 percent to 40 percent over three years; Provide $3.2 billion in payments to the state pension system; Increase the minimum wage to $11 per hour for state...

Key Business Provisions in the Tax Reform Law

On December 22, 2017, President Donald Trump signed into law H.R. 1 (the “Tax Act”), that enacted sweeping changes to the United States tax code. Below are some of the key sections of the Tax Act impacting businesses. These provisions are effective January 1, 2018, unless otherwise noted. Corporate Tax Rate and Alternative Minimum Tax (“AMT”) Currently, corporations are taxed at rates that range up to 35% and are additionally subject to the AMT. Corporations do not benefit from lower long-term capital gain rates. The Tax Act lowers the corporate tax rate to a flat 21% and eliminates the corporate AMT, both effective beginning in 2018 and on a permanent basis. In connection with the corporate rate cut, the Section 199 domestic manufacturing deduction is repealed going forward. The dividends received deduction is reduced from 80% to 65% and 70% to 50%, depending on ownership percentage. Increased Cost Recovery (Bonus Depreciation) Currently, taxpayers can immediately write off 50% of the cost of “qualified property” (generally, tangible personal property with a recovery period of 20 years or less). This ratio drops to 40% in 2018, 30% in 2019, and phases out after that. The Tax Act initially allows full current expensing...

Federal Tax Reform and the Potential Repeal of the Cash Method of Accounting

In the wake of the introduction by President Trump of his Tax Reform proposal on April 26, 2017, Congress, especially the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Ways and Means, will be considering various methods to fund tax rate reductions. The White House formally delivered the President’s proposed budget to Congress on May 23, 2017. One proposal likely to be under consideration is the repeal of the cash method of tax accounting for service businesses, though many experts dispute whether many of the budget’s finer details will ever pass both houses of Congress. Under current law, the cash method of accounting cannot be used for income tax purposes by (i) businesses that sell goods and therefore must keep inventories, and (ii) C corporations with average annual gross receipts of $5,000,000 or more. A taxpayer-favorable exception from the C corporation rule is available for qualified personal service corporations, consisting of personal service corporations (PSCs) in the fields of health, law, engineering, architecture, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, or consulting, when at least 95% of the stock of such PSCs is owned directly or indirectly by employees performing services in one of such fields. To oversimplify things, this means that law firms...